News Releases

February 14, 2011
For Immediate Release New information about the Martian terrain suggests the Red Planet's surface once had water. High levels of hematite, a mineral associated with liquid water on Earth, were discovered on Mars last year. This important find suggests the possibility of ancient lakebeds or seas on the planet's surface and increases the odds that Mars once harbored life.Professor Buck...
February 14, 2011
For Immediate Release People will go to great lengths in the name of science. One decided to hop on a bicycle and crisscross the continent for weeks. After accepting a position with the Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, Robbie Herrick, 39, set out on a 4,500-mile journey with nothing more than two bags and a bicycle. He left Houston, Texas on April 2...
February 14, 2011
For Immediate Release The Geographic Information Network of Alaska (GINA) at the University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute is collaborating with other agencies to provide near-real-time satellite data to the Bureau of Land Management's Alaska Fire Service. Armed with images taken from space, fire personnel will be able to track hot spots and fire movement, even under...
February 14, 2011
For Immediate Release Five scientists from the Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) will lead sessions at the International Geophysical and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS), September 20 through 24 at the Egan Convention Center in Anchorage. Drawing hundreds of scientists and engineers from across the globe, IGARSS is the premier international...
February 14, 2011
For Immediate Release FAIRBANKS, Alaska— A new technique allows scientists to determine the landscape of locales more than 48 million miles from Earth. The method determines the diameter, depth and overall shape of other planets’ surface craters from shadows visible in images captured from probes traveling through the Milky Way. John Chappelow, a postdoctoral fellow with the Arctic...
February 14, 2011
For Immediate Release Forest fire smoke was so thick in Interior Alaska on some days during the summer of 2004 that firedetection aircraft could not fly. On a few of those occasions, the Alaska Fire Service sent smokejumpers to fight fires that were detected only by satellites more than 400 miles above Alaska, using information processed by the Geographic Information Network of...
February 14, 2011
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE The Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) has appointed UAF alumna Nettie La Belle-Hamer as director of the Alaska Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Facility. La Belle-Hamer earned her Ph.D. and Master of Science degrees in space physics at UAF in 1994 and 1988, respectively. The Alaska SAR Facility (ASF), housed in the Geophysical Institute, is...
February 14, 2011
For Immediate Release  In celebration of the 15th anniversary of its first synthetic aperture radar data downlink, the Alaska Satellite Facility will host an open house. The open house will be held at the Elvey Building on the University of Alaska Fairbanks campus on Saturday, August 26, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The community is invited to come out and learn more about this...
February 14, 2011
For Immediate Release Images showing smoke from Interior wildfires suitable for publication in newspapers and for still images for television are available from the Geographic Information Network of Alaska Web site, located at http://www.gina.alaska.edu/media/. These images have been reduced in size to allow for easy media use. The new images demonstrate how the smoke situation in...
February 14, 2011
For Immediate Release  The Geographic Information Network of Alaska (GINA) at the University of Alaska Fairbanks has supplied the summer's first Landsat 5 image to the Alaska Fire Service for mapping of the Sheenjek River Fire. The image was captured June 21, 2005, and portrays active burning as bright orange spots in the scene. Armed with this satellite image, fire personnel...