News Releases

April 3, 2014
By Ned Rozell Cold water the color of iced tea wets the boots of Chris Arp as he yanks a power auger from the hole he just drilled in this quiet lake, a few miles from his office at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. A whiff of sulfur -- a sign there's not much oxygen in this pond born when ancient frozen ground thawed -- wafts upward as Ben Gaglioti clears slush from the hole with a...
February 14, 2014
Satellite data for the Arctic has shown that the amount of vegetation has increased or greened over the last three decades. A group of multidisciplinary scientists have worked together for the last decade to identify the causes of these changes and highlights of this research will be presented as the fifth installment in the 2014 Science for Alaska Lecture Series on Tuesday, February 18 at 7 p.m...
January 23, 2014
By Ned Rozell How big is the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting held in San Francisco every December? So big it’s like everyone from Barrow attending on Monday. The residents of Soldotna get Tuesday, Valdez Wednesday, Nome Thursday and Kotzebue Friday. More than 21,000 scientists walk through the Moscone Center during the week, along with others, like me, who are curious about what...
January 13, 2014
Girls on Ice is a unique, free, wilderness science education program for high school girls. Each year, a team of nine teenage girls and three instructors spend eleven days exploring and learning about mountain glaciers and alpine landscapes through scientific field studies with professional glaciologists and mountaineers. Applications for the summer 2014 program can be submitted now through...
November 18, 2013
By Ned Rozell In late August, seabird biologist John Piatt paused from his task of “stealing food from baby puffins” to look up at the green mountains of Attu, the last island in the long sweep of the Aleutians. Pasted to the side of 3,000-foot Attu Mountain was a snowfield with a dirty band of ice. Piatt, a U.S. Geological Survey Alaska Science Center scientist working on Savage...
September 19, 2013
By Ned Rozell Beavers and jet skis surprised four adventurers on their recent attempt to row through the Northwest Passage. Vancouver, British Columbia residents Kevin Vallely, Paul Gleeson, Frank Wolf and Denis Barnett are now back home after the team stopped short of its goal of gliding through the northern waterway on muscle power. After ever-changing winds stalled their 25-foot...
September 18, 2013
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Sept. 18, 2013CONTACT: Diana Campbell, 907-474-5229, dlcampbell@alaska.edu Fairbanks, Alaska— For the first time, researchers completed an extensive exploration of how quickly ice is melting underneath a rapidly changing Antarctic glacier, possibly the biggest source of uncertainty in global sea level projections.
 Martin Truffer, a physics professor at the University of...
September 5, 2013
 By Ned Rozell Forty-six years ago, a ship long as the Empire State Building sailed with intention toward obstacles that captains usually avoid. The icebreaking tanker SS Manhattan was an oil company’s attempt to see if it might be profitable to move new Alaska oil to the East Coast by plowing through the ice-clogged Northwest Passage. Begging his way aboard was Merritt Helfferich...
August 22, 2013
 By Ned Rozell Despite taking up as much space as Australia, the blue-white puzzle of ice floating on the Arctic Ocean is an abstraction to the billions who have never seen it. But continued shrinkage of sea ice is changing life for many living things. A few Alaska scientists added their observations to a recent journal article on the subject. Since 1999, the loss of northern sea...
June 7, 2013
Scientist: Arctic sea ice needs better forecastsFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: June 3, 2013CONTACT: Amy Hartley, GI information officer, 907-474-5823, amy.hartley@gi.alaska.edu Fairbanks, Alaska—With climate change causing the arctic ice pack to melt, more and more northern waters are opening up to shipping each summer. Sea ice in the region is a major hazard, warns Hajo Eicken, a...