News Releases

May 24, 2013
 The National Geographic Society has named University of Alaska Fairbanks geophysics assistant professor Erin Pettit as one of their Emerging Explorers for 2013. She will be featured in the June issue of National Geographic magazine for her unique approach to researching glaciers and for her outreach program that engages teenage girls in science. Pettit will also receive a $10,000 award...
May 24, 2013
 The National Geographic Society has named University of Alaska Fairbanks geophysics assistant professor Erin Pettit as one of their Emerging Explorers for 2013. She will be featured in the June issue of National Geographic magazine for her unique approach to researching glaciers and for her outreach program that engages teenage girls in science. Pettit will also receive a $10,000 award...
May 16, 2013
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: May 16, 2013CONTACT: Diana Campbell, Geophysical Institute Public Relations, 907-474-5229, dlcampbell@alaska.eduFairbanks, Alaska— Alaska’s melting glaciers remain one of the largest contributors to the world’s rising sea levels, say two University of Alaska Fairbanks geophysicists.UAF Geophysical Institute researchers Anthony Arendt and Regine Hock...
May 16, 2013
By Molly RettigOn the 5-mile snowmachine ride up to Point Barrow, we saw several fresh polar bear tracks the size of dinner plates, a pile of whalebones from last year, and a 3-foot-wide crack in the sea ice that could swallow a sled. The crack was created when an ice floe in the open water crashed into shore-fast ice.It was masked in a snowdrift, and our guide Brower Frantz nearly fell into it....
May 13, 2013
 The 2013 Polar Sea Ice Field Course is underway in Barrow, Alaska. The course introduces graduate students to the main field techniques used in sea-ice studies of an inter-disciplinary nature (geophysical, biological, geochemical). The 10-day course will include instruction on the sea ice, field experiments, lab analysis and more. As part of the course, students have developed a blog to...
May 13, 2013
 By Molly Rettig  In Alaska, our lives revolve around the weather. When it comes to predicting conditions like temperature, snow and rain, the best glimpse into the future comes from climate models. But standard climate models are very broad—looking at how global climate will be affected by things like escalating carbon dioxide emissions.  In a land of permafrost,...
March 22, 2013
Erin Pettit’s photos live a double life. By day, they aid a geophysicist with her research on frozen waterfalls. By night, they make appearances in the Fairbanks art scene. They have already debuted in a First Friday gallery showing. Now they are coming to the College Coffeehouse Wednesday, March 27 from 7 - 8 p.m., when Pettit will lead a discussion about her photos. Are they art, science...
March 20, 2013
 By Ned Rozell CHENA HOT SPRINGS — “This is your chance — maybe your only chance in a lifetime — to see vole poop in a tunnel,” said Mike Taras, an expert tracker and wildlife educator for the Alaska Department of Fish and Game. Seven people kneel and then squint into a blue-white opening in the snow. We see tiny cigars, evidence that a red-backed or meadow vole had indeed paused...
March 19, 2013
 The University of Alaska Fairbanks College of Natural Science and Mathematics will showcase the role of the ocean in the retreat of Arctic Sea Ice this week. Seminars will be held in the Geophysical Institute Globe Room and Elvey Auditorium. On March 19th and 20th, the Sydney Chapman Chair and the International Arctic Research Center will present an Untersteiner Lecture & Discussion...
March 7, 2013
 By Ned Rozell Kenji Yoshikawa will soon sleep on brilliant, blue-white landscape that has never felt the imprint of his boots. Beginning on spring equinox, the permafrost scientist and a partner will attempt to drive snowmachines from Prudhoe Bay to Canada’s Baffin Island.  While traveling a distance equal to Seattle to Tokyo to Seattle over land and sea ice, Yoshikawa will...