News Releases

June 6, 2013
In a new feature that pairs young and distinguished scientists, Professor Emeritus Carl Benson of the UAF Geophysical Institute is interviewed on his pioneering work on snow stratigraphy on the Greenland ice sheet. In a reflective Q&A, Benson answers questions posed by Gifford J. Wong, a doctoral candidate at Darmouth College. The interview is a highlight of the recent Witness the Arctic...
June 6, 2013
By Molly Rettig   Every summer, Alaska’s glaciers melt and send vast quantities of water gushing through silty gray rivers, past towns and villages and finally into the sea. Some glaciers calve directly into the ocean, instantly losing car-sized chunks of ice and wowing boats full of tourists. The world's melting glaciers are boosting ocean levels 0.71 millimeters a year, accounting for...
May 31, 2013
 Hajo Eicken, a geophysicist and sea ice expert at the University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute, has penned a Comment piece that is in Nature. Eicken's Comment addresses the need for better forecasts of Arctic sea ice and is available here. With climate change causing the Arctic ice pack to melt, more and more northern waters are opening up to shipping each summer. Sea ice...
May 24, 2013
By Molly Rettig The trick to getting a good ice core is to drill straight down into the sea ice, continually clear the slush gurgling up from the ocean, correctly reassemble the core fragments on the tray, take its temperature every couple of inches before it melts or cools, and saw it into hockey-puck-shaped chunks without dropping them in the snow. And, of course, not drop the heavy...
May 24, 2013
 The National Geographic Society has named University of Alaska Fairbanks geophysics assistant professor Erin Pettit as one of their Emerging Explorers for 2013. She will be featured in the June issue of National Geographic magazine for her unique approach to researching glaciers and for her outreach program that engages teenage girls in science. Pettit will also receive a $10,000 award...
May 24, 2013
 The National Geographic Society has named University of Alaska Fairbanks geophysics assistant professor Erin Pettit as one of their Emerging Explorers for 2013. She will be featured in the June issue of National Geographic magazine for her unique approach to researching glaciers and for her outreach program that engages teenage girls in science. Pettit will also receive a $10,000 award...
May 16, 2013
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: May 16, 2013CONTACT: Diana Campbell, Geophysical Institute Public Relations, 907-474-5229, dlcampbell@alaska.eduFairbanks, Alaska— Alaska’s melting glaciers remain one of the largest contributors to the world’s rising sea levels, say two University of Alaska Fairbanks geophysicists.UAF Geophysical Institute researchers Anthony Arendt and Regine Hock...
May 16, 2013
By Molly RettigOn the 5-mile snowmachine ride up to Point Barrow, we saw several fresh polar bear tracks the size of dinner plates, a pile of whalebones from last year, and a 3-foot-wide crack in the sea ice that could swallow a sled. The crack was created when an ice floe in the open water crashed into shore-fast ice.It was masked in a snowdrift, and our guide Brower Frantz nearly fell into it....
May 13, 2013
 The 2013 Polar Sea Ice Field Course is underway in Barrow, Alaska. The course introduces graduate students to the main field techniques used in sea-ice studies of an inter-disciplinary nature (geophysical, biological, geochemical). The 10-day course will include instruction on the sea ice, field experiments, lab analysis and more. As part of the course, students have developed a blog to...
May 13, 2013
 By Molly Rettig  In Alaska, our lives revolve around the weather. When it comes to predicting conditions like temperature, snow and rain, the best glimpse into the future comes from climate models. But standard climate models are very broad—looking at how global climate will be affected by things like escalating carbon dioxide emissions.  In a land of permafrost,...