News Releases

December 15, 2011
 By Ned RozellSAN FRANCISCO — For the thirteenth straight year, I’m happy to be spending one week of December here, at the Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union, where more than 15,000 scientists gather for a week to discuss the latest news of the world.  Here are a few items from the first two days: Bering Glacier has stopped its rush: Alaska’s largest glacier,...
December 7, 2011
 The Geophysical Institute has a strong presence at the American Geophysical Union's Fall Meeting in San Francisco. Joining forces with the Alaska Satellite Facility, the International Arctic Research Center, the Institute of Northern Engineering, the Water and Environmental Resources Center and the Institute of Marine Science, the GI is part of a combined booth in the Exhibitors Hall. The...
December 5, 2011
As of Jan. 1, 2012, Chris Petrich will begin work at the Northern Research Institute (Norut) in Narvik, Norway. Petrich will be working on ice-related issues as part of a team of researchers. For a start, he will continue his work on oil-in-ice and other issues of relevance to Norway, including ice loads in hydropower dams.  Petrich has been at the Geophysical Institute since 2006, when...
December 1, 2011
 The current issue of Nature, an international weekly journal of science, includes a comment on the risks of widespread permafrost thaw. The commentary is based on a collective estimate that northern soils are thawing and this thaw will release huge amounts of carbon into the atmosphere thereby accelerating climate change. Multiple scientists from the University of Alaska Fairbanks...
November 30, 2011
 Graduate students are needed to fill positions at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (applicants for Ph.D. program preferred, but strong applications for M.S. program will be considered, also for topics in sea-ice research other than those outlined below): (1) Ph.D. graduate student support available for a study linking sea-ice transport properties (dielectric properties, permeability...
November 28, 2011
 By Ned Rozell Using some of the great datasets available today, Mark Fahnestock figured the average winter temperatures of the Arctic from the time he was born until he was 10 years old. He compared that data to the same period in his son’s life, finding the Arctic has warmed about five degrees since Fahnestock was his son’s age. All that warmth affects things, the scientist said at a...
October 27, 2011
Read up on some of the latest research news in the current edition of the Geophysical Institute Quarterly Report. Glaciers, thermokarst lakes, the 20th anniversary of the Alaska Satellite Facility, GI's new Education Group and details on our new director, Bob McCoy, are all available in this new, extended edition of the Quarterly.  View the pdf here or request a copy of the publication...
October 21, 2011
 Ben Jones, Geophysical Institute doctoral student in the Snow, Ice and Permafrost group, is lead author of “Modern thermokarst lake dynamics in the continuous permafrost zone, northern Seward Peninsula, Alaska,” appearing in the Journal of Geophysical Research Biogeosciences, volume 116. The article was also featured in the Editors’ Highlight section of the journal.  Recognition...
October 14, 2011
 Professors Bernard Coakley and Hajo Eicken are included in a special feature titled "Scientific challenges in the Arctic: Open water" in this week's edition of Nature. The publication is an international weekly journal of science. Read the detailed report here.
October 13, 2011
 The U.S. Permafrost Association will provide six $500 travel grants for U.S.-based students and post-graduate researchers to attend the American Geophysical Union’s Fall Meeting in 2011. Applicants must be first author on a permafrost-related research presentation at AGU. Preference will be given to applicants who possess both U.S.P.A. and P.Y.R.N. memberships. Undergraduate students are...