News Releases

October 12, 2011
 Orders can be placed now for “North by 2020: Perspectives on Alaska’s Changing Social-Ecological Systems,” a 736-page book edited by Associate Professor of Political Science Amy Lauren Lovecraft and Geophysical Institute Professor Hajo Eicken and available through the University of Alaska Press.  “North by 2020” originated from a series of workshops held at the Alaska Forum of the...
September 20, 2011
 By Ned Rozell A few years ago, Ronald Daanen was driving north of Coldfoot on the Dalton Highway, looking for drunken trees. He pulled over when he saw some tipsy spruce on a hillside.  The University of Alaska Fairbanks scientist thought the tilted trees would be a classic sign of thawing permafrost, ground that has remained frozen through the heat of at least two summers....
August 29, 2011
 The work of Geophysical Institute Research Assistant Professor Guido Grosse and colleagues has been spotlighted by the American Geophysical Union. Grosse is the lead author of “Vulnerability of high-latitude soil organic carbon in North America to disturbance,” a comprehensive investigation into climate change impacts on soil carbon storage in the far north appearing in the Journal of...
August 25, 2011
 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: May 26, 2011CONTACT: Anthony Arendt, UAF Geophysical Institute research professor, 907-474-7427, or via e-mail at anthony.arendt@gi.alaska.eduFairbanks, Alaska—With an estimated 34,000 square miles of ice, about the size of Maine, Alaska’s multitude of glaciers have a global impact. Anthony Arendt, an assistant research...
August 25, 2011
 By Ned Rozell In places where the air gets cold enough to freeze seawater, sea ice creates a world known by few people — a shifting, ephemeral, both jagged and smooth platform of white that clings to the shore for much of the year. In Barrow, people who hunt whales start packing down snowmachine trails over this blue-white dreamscape in March. The trails allow a few dozen crews to...
August 25, 2011
 By Ned Rozell Yakutat Glacier, near the Alaska town of the same name and flowing from the mountains near the Canada border, calves into a lake as deep as an ocean bay. The icefield that feeds Yakutat is large enough to cover the five boroughs of New York City. Despite its bulk, the glacier is doomed unless we experience a drastic change in climate. Barbara Truessel has been on...
August 24, 2011
 Vladimir Romanovsky, a Geophysical Institute professor with the Snow, Ice and Permafrost group, was the lead author of a paper that revealed permafrost warming continues throughout a wide swath of the Northern Hemisphere. In the report, published in the April-June 2010 edition of Permafrost and Periglacial Processes, Romanovsky and a team of scientists describe the thermal state of high-...
August 24, 2011
 Professor of Geophysics Hajo Eicken was awarded the 2010 Louis Agassiz Medal by the European Geosciences Union. The EGU selected Eicken for his outstanding contribution to the study of both the physical and biological properties of sea ice and for the scientist’s pioneering methods applied in the field as well as the laboratory. The EGU’s Division on Cryospheric Sciences established...
August 24, 2011
 Geophysical Institute Professor Emeritus Keith Echelmeyer died at age 56 on Oct. 2, 2010. The glaciologist, pilot, mountaineer and fighter for life passed away with his incomparable wife Susan Campbell by his side. She wrote the following in his obituary: “During his two decades as a professor of geophysics at the Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, Keith...
August 24, 2011
 Staff in the Geophysical Institute’s Outreach Office recently created Cryospheric Connection, an online professional development course for secondary teachers. The NASA-funded course is focused on permafrost and examines how this changing element of the cryosphere affects Earth as a whole. The program began in Fall 2009 and weaves the traditional knowledge of three Alaska Native Elders...