News Releases

November 11, 2011
 Physics Department & Journal Club to answer:  “Why are we still studying the aurora?”  Who: Don Hampton, Optical Science Manager Poker Flat Research Range  Where: GI Auditorium, Elvey Building  When: Today, Friday, Nov. 11 at 3:45 p.m.  Abstract: “Why are we still studying the aurora?"  You may (or may not) be surprised how often...
November 2, 2011
 Research Professor Emeritus Dirk Lummerzheim of the Geophysical Institute will provide a public lecture at Gustavus Adolphus College in Minnesota in early November. The college invited Lummerzheim to make the trip to present on mysteries of the aurora. Lummerzheim is affiliated with the the GI's Space Physics research group and is an aurora expert.  
November 1, 2011
Geophysical Institute Professor Emeritus Gene Wescott will be a featured artist at the Well Street Art Gallery starting November 4. The scientist's wood block prints will be on display starting with November's First Friday event. Wescott is affiliated with the Space Physics research group at the GI. For more information, visit http://www.wellstreetart.com/. The image to the left is...
October 27, 2011
Read up on some of the latest research news in the current edition of the Geophysical Institute Quarterly Report. Glaciers, thermokarst lakes, the 20th anniversary of the Alaska Satellite Facility, GI's new Education Group and details on our new director, Bob McCoy, are all available in this new, extended edition of the Quarterly.  View the pdf here or request a copy of the publication...
September 26, 2011
According to GI Professor Emeritus Chuck Deehr, a solar event occurred on Saturday, Sept. 24, 2011. The effects of the event are expected to reach Earth on Monday September 26. This is not directed toward Earth, but some effects will be felt. Watch the short term forecast for the most up-to-date information. Currently, aurora is predicted to be active both Monday and Tuesday. More details on...
September 12, 2011
 Charles Deehr, Geophysical Institute aurora forecaster has issued an Aurora Alert: The effects of the solar events of last week have reached Earth and a large magnetic storm is in progress.  The aurora associated with this storm has already covered Scandinavia.  It was visible in Central Europe during the night on Friday, September 9.   Because of the activity...
August 25, 2011
 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: June17, 2011CONTACT: Amy Hartley, Geophysical Institute information officer, 907-474-5823, amy.hartley@gi.alaska.eduFairbanks, Alaska—Nearly one year ago, a repurposed NASA spacecraft flew by the comet Hartley 2. As a result, a multitude of high-resolution images were gathered over 50 days that allow scientists to understand the nature of the comet’s surface and it’s...
August 25, 2011
 For more than a decade Roger Smith has presided over the Geophysical Institute, serving as the chief administrator for all aspects of the facility. With roughly 300 employees, a $30 million budget and active research underway, the job has proven it takes both mental and physical stamina. Despite challenges experienced in the position, the outgoing director feels he’s met the goals he set...
August 24, 2011
 In 2010, a telescopic imager that Poker Flat Research Range Optical Science Manager Don Hampton helped design more than a decade ago captured the glowing knuckles and smooth waistline of the comet Hartley 2, which is perhaps a fragment of the formation of the solar system 4.5 billion years ago.  Hampton, who teaches physics classes at the University of Alaska Fairbanks and works...
August 24, 2011
 The sun’s sluggish activity over the last year has sent many faithful aurora watchers to the experts at the Geophysical Institute. They want to know why there are so few aurora-filled nights and when they can expect the bands and curls of light to reappear in the night sky. Unfortunately, there isn’t an easy answer to their questions. The aurora is dependent on the sun. Generally the...