News Releases

June 7, 2018
Earth scientists consistently look for a reliable way to forecast earthquakes. New research from University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute professor Carl Tape may help in that endeavor, due to a unique set of circumstances. “Our observations have recorded an unequivocally interesting sequence of events,” Tape said. Tape and his colleagues found evidence for accelerating activity...
May 30, 2018
Life returned to the asteroid-blasted Chicxulub crater much sooner than at some other sites far from the impact point 66 million years ago, according to a University of Alaska Fairbanks scientist and fellow researchers. UAF Geophysical Institute professor Michael Whalen studied a core drilled about 4,500 feet below the crater, offshore of Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula. Whalen and colleagues, led by...
November 22, 2016
Around 65 million years ago, a massive asteroid crashed into the Gulf of Mexico. The impact and subsequent effects wiped out about 75 percent of all life on Earth, including most of the dinosaurs. Scientists studying the resulting Chicxulub crater are learning how large asteroid impacts deform rocks in a way that may produce habitat advantageous to early life forms. In April and May 2016, an...
March 12, 2014
The EarthScope National Office is excited to invite all who are interested to attend the EarthScope Alaska-Yukon Regional Workshop for Interpretive Professionals. This workshop will be the 10th in a series of EarthScope workshops that attempt to connect informal educators with place-based Earth science in North America. The upcoming workshop will have a focus on the geology of Alaska and Eastern...
February 6, 2014
By Ned Rozell An expected event in Alaska could affect millions of Americans. Here’s how: On Thursday, March 27, 2014, a slab of the seafloor larger than human imagination fractures, rumbling beneath the Alaska Peninsula. In several planet-ringing minutes, thousands of years of potential energy releases to become kinetic. A great earthquake occurs right where scientists predicted it...
January 31, 2013
 By Ned Rozell CRAIG — In this cozy Southeast Alaska community that smells of red cedar chips used to power a boiler that heats both the school and the pool, seismologist Natalia Ruppert responded to an hour of questions from more than 150 people who gathered in the auditorium of the Craig High School. The residents of Craig and the outlying areas, many of them wearing Xtratufs and...
November 5, 2012
 The 2002 Denali Fault earthquake rang in at a magnitude 7.9 and was located about 41 miles east/southeast of Denali National Park & Preserve. It was the largest earthquake on the Denali fault since at least 1912. A decade later, the whopper quake continues to awe scientists that study Alaska’s seismicity. The massive temblor ranks as the eighth largest earthquake to have occurred in the...
September 27, 2012
 By Ned Rozell A couple of summers ago, David Tomeo was exploring a creekbed in Denali National Park, preparing for a field seminar on the park’s dinosaurs he would help lead a few weeks later. With a trained eye for the impressions dinosaurs pressed into mud millions of years ago, Tomeo walked to a large boulder in the middle of a landslide. “Right in the middle of it, a four-toed...
June 21, 2012
 By Ned Rozell The more Tony Fiorillo explores Alaska, the more dinosaur tracks he finds on its lonely ridgetops. The latest examples are the stone footprints of two different dinosaurs near the tiny settlement of Chisana in the Wrangell Mountains. Fiorillo, a dinosaur hunter with the Museum of Nature and Science in Dallas, recently wrote of the foot impressions of a large plant-...
May 16, 2012
The Alaska Earthquake Information Center, based at the Geophysical Institute at the Unviersity of Alaska Fairbanks, collects earthquake data from a network of more than 400 seismic sites. Their job is to not only collect event data, but analyze and archive it for the State of Alaska, other agencies and the general public. Although Alaska is always rumbling with some seismic activity, recent...