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Stone spear points from Serpentine Hot Springs on the Seward Peninsula hint that ancient people may have migrated northward between ice sheets from warmer parts of America,

On a November morning long ago, Jeff and Annette Freymueller were feeling the effects of the 1 a.m. flight that had carried them home, to end-of-the-line Fairbanks.

DENALI NATIONAL PARK — When I was 12 years old, I didn’t know permafrost was like frozen lasagna. I didn’t know what permafrost was.

In Alan Weisman’s book, “The World Without Us,” the author ponders “a world from which we all suddenly vanished. Tomorrow.”

About 160 years ago, U.S. Secretary of State William Seward was taking some heat for his significant role in the purchase of Alaska.

Just outside my window here at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, workers are drilling into the asphalt of a parking lot using a truck-mounted rig.

All of a sudden, we are again the land of no night. Summer happens every year, but it is always a surprise.

“Jeremy offers us only his incessant snoring to remind us that he is a man and not a god.”

Snow falling silently on Alaska’s mountains will in a few months transform into a medium for migrating salmon, and so much more.