News Releases

March 20, 2012
How the Amerasia Basin was created, the utility of infrasound and debris lobes on the move in northern Alaska -- all of these topics are covered in the latest edition of the Geophysical Institute Quarterly Report. You can access a pdf of Volume 24, Number 4 online here or retrieve hard copies from the Outreach Office in Elvey 611. Find out what your colleagues are up to!
December 7, 2011
 The Geophysical Institute has a strong presence at the American Geophysical Union's Fall Meeting in San Francisco. Joining forces with the Alaska Satellite Facility, the International Arctic Research Center, the Institute of Northern Engineering, the Water and Environmental Resources Center and the Institute of Marine Science, the GI is part of a combined booth in the Exhibitors Hall. The...
November 10, 2011
 By Ned Rozell There’s a new kind of dinosaur out there, and it lived in Alaska. Its bones, long turned to stone, are part of a cliff in northern Alaska. That’s where dinosaur-hunter Tony Fiorillo brushed dirt away from a portion of its massive skull – something that most of us would mistake for a rock.  The year was 2006. It was August and summer had fled the Colville...
October 14, 2011
 Professors Bernard Coakley and Hajo Eicken are included in a special feature titled "Scientific challenges in the Arctic: Open water" in this week's edition of Nature. The publication is an international weekly journal of science. Read the detailed report here.
October 12, 2011
 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Sept. 26, 2011CONTACT: Amy Hartley, Geophysical Institute information officer, 907-474-5823, amy.hartley@gi.alaska.eduFairbanks, Alaska— Located at the top of the globe, beneath the Arctic Ocean, the Amerasia Basin is poorly understood. This large depression in the ocean floor was created during the Mesozoic Era, the age of the dinosaurs, but how the tectonic plates...
September 19, 2011
Professor Bernard Coakley is aboard the research vessel Marcus G. Langseth with aims to collect multi-channel seismic reflection data across the transition from the Chukchi Shelf to the Chukchi Borderland. Coakley and the crew will conduct research in the Chukchi Sea until early October and hope the data they collect will provide insight on how the Amerasia Basin formed during the Mesozoic era,...
February 14, 2011
For Immediate Release Students participating in a geology field camp with University of Alaska Fairbanks faculty found the fossilized footprint from a small meat-eating dinosaur in Denali National Park in June 2005. That fossilized footprint is the first concrete evidence that dinosaurs once roamed Alaska's Interior. What did the Interior and the rest of Alaska look like eons ago...
February 14, 2011
For Immediate Release Students participating in a geology field camp with University of Alaska Fairbanks faculty found the fossilized footprint from a small meat-eating dinosaur in Denali National Park in June 2005. That fossilized footprint is the first concrete evidence that dinosaurs once roamed Alaska's Interior. What did the Interior and the rest of Alaska look like eons ago...
February 14, 2011
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE About 65 million years ago, a massive disruption led to worldwide extinction of dinosaurs. The impact of a giant asteroid created massive tsunamis and spewed forth a global cloud of carbon gases that altered Earth’s atmosphere and blocked the light for weeks, possibly years. In recent years, that impact event has been linked to a 112-mile-wide crater, dubbed...
February 14, 2011
For Immediate Release FAIRBANKS, Alaska—An ice-free Arctic has the potential to unlock a wealth of resources that have long been inaccessible, buried beneath the ocean floor. This year, Russia nabbed a slew of attention for its claim that the Lomonosov Ridge is simply an extension of the Siberian continental shelf, an area believed to be rich in oil and gas reserves. Bernard...